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Most major US e-commerce companies fail to realize pay equity for women in leadership

This a 2022 report. It is the most current diverse pay gap report for US e-commerce available on Spendwell.

rankings

MORE INFO
Corporations paying typically underrepresented executives on par with other executives, rank higher.
better choice

Apple

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
Apple pays its highest earning executive women at or above what its highest earning executive men make.

1/10

Home Depot

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Home Depot pays its highest-paid executive women about 86% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

2/10

eBay

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, eBay pays its highest-paid executive women about 71% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

3/10

Best Buy

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Best Buy pays its highest-paid executive women about 71% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

4/10

Target

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Target pays its highest-paid executive women about 59% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

5/10

Albertsons

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Albertsons pays its highest-paid executive women about 46% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

6/10

Walmart

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Walmart pays its highest-paid executive women about 38% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

7/10

Amazon

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
Amazon has no women among its highest-paid executives and therefore pays its executive women 100% less than executive men.

8/10(tied)

Costco

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
Costco has no women among its highest-paid executives and therefore pays its executive women 100% less than executive men.

8/10(tied)

Kroger

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
Kroger has no women among its highest-paid executives and therefore pays its executive women 100% less than executive men.

8/10(tied)

worse choice

report summary

Of the 10 major e-commerce companies headquartered in the United States, only one has managed to ensure pay equity for executive women: Apple. Three of these e-commerce companies have no women at all amongst their highest earning executives: Amazon, Costco and Kroger. Of the six remaining e-commerce companies ranked here with women amongst their highest earners, women executives earn about 62% of what their male counterparts earn.

about this industry

Retailers deriving all or a major portion of their revenue from online sales.
[beta*]

Diversity Pay Gap Methodology

In the United States, a publicly traded corporation is required to annually report the total compensation packages of its highest-paid earners. At a minimum, a corporation reports the compensation packages of its 5 most well-paid executives. These reported compensation packages serve as an easily assessed data point by which corporations can be compared to one another specific to the pay gaps between historically underrepresented and historically well-represented groups. This Spendwell ranking is predicated on the values-based statement that a corporation should pay its historically underrepresented employees on par with their historically well-represented peers.

This initial diversity pay gap ranking includes only gender considerations. Gender is currently the only facet of diversity Spendwell can measure without significant risk of misrepresenting individual identities. This is because publicly accessible texts about executives use pronouns. In the future, other important facets of identity will be included in these rankings. When personal identifiers can be ethically sourced, these future facets will likely include additional underrepresented groups specific to race, ethnicity, national origin, LGBTQ+ identity and disability status.

Companies with a smaller gap between averaged, historically well-represented executive compensation and averaged, historically underrepresented executive compensation, rank higher than companies with larger gaps. In order to account for fluctuations in compensation and employee turnover, Spendwell reports on the last 5 available years of compensation reporting. This means Spendwell is currently reporting data pertaining to the top 20 compensation packages reported over the last 6 available years. In most instances, this includes the six years through the end of fiscal year 2020 - which for most companies was reported sometime during 2021.

Spendwell’s current diversity pay gap ranking looks at 2 data points derived from the reported compensation data of a corporation’s most well-paid executives: average pay and gender (determined indirectly through pronouns used in various written reports about executives). This data reveals the average compensation of executive men and women, which is then compared as described above. Women in this instance, being the historically underrepresented group in this specific comparative pairing.

In some reporting instances, Spendwell’s rankings will include private corporations with no current compensation figures publicly available, nor are the names and titles of the company's most well-compensated employees available. These corporations might be included in a report, but will be listed as not ranked unless they have voluntarily published necessary information and Spendwell has been made aware of its publication. All ranked corporations are ranked based on the previously mentioned data reported to the SEC through end-of-year or annual reports, which can be accessed through the SEC’s Edgar search tool here:

SEC EDGAR SEARCH

Search for a company by name to view its filed DEF 14A reports.

[All methodologies are in beta. They can and many will be revised before final release and updates will be likely for many even after final release.]
[beta*]

Diversity Pay Gap Methodology

In the United States, a publicly traded corporation is required to annually report the total compensation packages of its highest-paid earners. At a minimum, a corporation reports the compensation packages of its 5 most well-paid executives. These reported compensation packages serve as an easily assessed data point by which corporations can be compared to one another specific to the pay gaps between historically underrepresented and historically well-represented groups. This Spendwell ranking is predicated on the values-based statement that a corporation should pay its historically underrepresented employees on par with their historically well-represented peers.

This initial diversity pay gap ranking includes only gender considerations. Gender is currently the only facet of diversity Spendwell can measure without significant risk of misrepresenting individual identities. This is because publicly accessible texts about executives use pronouns. In the future, other important facets of identity will be included in these rankings. When personal identifiers can be ethically sourced, these future facets will likely include additional underrepresented groups specific to race, ethnicity, national origin, LGBTQ+ identity and disability status.

Companies with a smaller gap between averaged, historically well-represented executive compensation and averaged, historically underrepresented executive compensation, rank higher than companies with larger gaps. In order to account for fluctuations in compensation and employee turnover, Spendwell reports on the last 5 available years of compensation reporting. This means Spendwell is currently reporting data pertaining to the top 20 compensation packages reported over the last 6 available years. In most instances, this includes the six years through the end of fiscal year 2020 - which for most companies was reported sometime during 2021.

Spendwell’s current diversity pay gap ranking looks at 2 data points derived from the reported compensation data of a corporation’s most well-paid executives: average pay and gender (determined indirectly through pronouns used in various written reports about executives). This data reveals the average compensation of executive men and women, which is then compared as described above. Women in this instance, being the historically underrepresented group in this specific comparative pairing.

In some reporting instances, Spendwell’s rankings will include private corporations with no current compensation figures publicly available, nor are the names and titles of the company's most well-compensated employees available. These corporations might be included in a report, but will be listed as not ranked unless they have voluntarily published necessary information and Spendwell has been made aware of its publication. All ranked corporations are ranked based on the previously mentioned data reported to the SEC through end-of-year or annual reports, which can be accessed through the SEC’s Edgar search tool here:

SEC EDGAR SEARCH

Search for a company by name to view its filed DEF 14A reports.

[*All methodologies are in beta. They can and many will be revised before final release and updates will be likely for many even after final release.]

Ranking



rankings

MORE INFO
Corporations paying typically underrepresented executives on par with other executives, rank higher.
better choice

Apple

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
Apple pays its highest earning executive women at or above what its highest earning executive men make.

1/10

Home Depot

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Home Depot pays its highest-paid executive women about 86% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

2/10

eBay

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, eBay pays its highest-paid executive women about 71% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

3/10

Best Buy

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Best Buy pays its highest-paid executive women about 71% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

4/10

Target

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Target pays its highest-paid executive women about 59% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

5/10

Albertsons

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Albertsons pays its highest-paid executive women about 46% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

6/10

Walmart

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
On average, Walmart pays its highest-paid executive women about 38% of what it pays its highest-paid executive men.

7/10

Amazon

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
Amazon has no women among its highest-paid executives and therefore pays its executive women 100% less than executive men.

8/10(tied)

Costco

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
Costco has no women among its highest-paid executives and therefore pays its executive women 100% less than executive men.

8/10(tied)

Kroger

diversity pay gap*gender
human impact
Kroger has no women among its highest-paid executives and therefore pays its executive women 100% less than executive men.

8/10(tied)

worse choice


This report is based on data collected through 2022-03-15.
Report id: 40--2022-08-10T07:49:04.835Z